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dynamically calling DLLs

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Pjot:

--- Quote ---Shortly, I will fully develop my own inline version and will replace Dyncall with it.

--- End quote ---

That's really brave! The inline ASM code look like a complete nightmare to me...  :-\

But good news that it works, and presumably it also will for Unix-based platforms, as Dyncall is a multiplatform library!

Regards
Peter

Steve A.:

--- Quote from: Pjot on October 21, 2010, 11:33:17 am ---That's really brave! The inline ASM code look like a complete nightmare to me...  :-\

But good news that it works, and presumably it also will for Unix-based platforms, as Dyncall is a multiplatform library!

--- End quote ---

Yes, multiplatform is an important consideration in what I do to Bxbasic these days.
As to the ASM code (nightmare)..., yes and no.

I have to admit when I asked Jacob Navia (developer of LccWin32) for assistance in explaining Lcc's assembly code, he tried to discourage me from using it. Not that there is any problem in using inline asm code, it's just that Lcc's inline code is un-documented. Nowhere in the LccWin32 docs does it explain it's usage. Fortunately, John Findlay, (practically famous for his Lcc tutorials) stepped up and explained what I needed to know about Lcc inline.

I'm quite familiar with assembly language. You could say it's my "first language", when it comes to programming languages.
Additionally, Lcc's inline assembly is based on what is called "the AT&T syntax".
Even though the code is being run on an x86 CPU, it's not Intel style code. It's a style of syntax originally developed at AT&T Bell Labs for Unix machines. Hence, most Linux compilers also use AT&T syntax, (multiplatform).

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